Archives for posts with tag: positive

If you want to Dare To Soar and move on to better things, you have to give up the things that weigh you down – which is not always as obvious and easy as it sounds.

Starting today, give up…

  1. Letting the opinions of others control your life. – People know your name, not your story. They’ve heard what you’ve done, but not what you’ve been through. So take their opinions of you with a grain of salt. In the end, it’s not what others think, it’s what you think about yourself that counts. Sometimes you have to do exactly what’s best for you and your life, not what’s best for everyone else.
  2. The shame of past failures. – You will fail sometimes, and that’s okay. The faster you accept this, the faster you can get on with being brilliant. Your past does not equal your future. Just because you failed yesterday; or all day today; or a moment ago; or for the last six months; or for the last sixteen years, doesn’t have any impact on the current moment. All that matters is what you do right now. Read Awaken the Giant Within.
  3. Being indecisive about what you want. – You will never leave where you are until you decide where you would rather be. It’s all about finding and pursuing your passion. Neglecting passion blocks creative flow. When you’re passionate, you’re energized. Likewise, when you lack passion, your energy is low and unproductive. Energy is everything when it comes to being successful. Make a decision to figure out what you want, and then pursue it passionately.
  4. Procrastinating on the goals that matter to you. – There are two primary choices in life: to accept conditions as they exist, or accept the responsibility for changing them. Follow your intuition. Don’t give up trying to do what you really want to do. When there is love and inspiration, you can’t go wrong. And whatever it is you want to do, do it now. There are only so many tomorrows. Trust me, in a year from now, you will wish you had started today.
  5. Choosing to do nothing. – You don’t get to choose how you are going to die, or when. You can only decide how you are going to live, right now. Every day is a new chance to choose. Choose to change your perspective. Choose to flip the switch in your mind from negative to positive. Choose to turn on the light and stop fretting about with insecurity and doubt. Choose to do work that you are proud of. Choose to see the best in others, and to show your best to others. Choose to truly LIVE, right now.
  6. Your need to be right. – If you keep on saying you’re right, even if you are right now, eventually you will be wrong. Aim for success, but never give up your right to be wrong. Because when you do, you will also lose your ability to learn new things and move forward with your life. Read The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.
  7. Running from problems that should be fixed. – We make life harder than it has to be. The difficulties started when… conversations became texting, feelings became subliminal, sex became a game, the word ‘love’ fell out of context, trust faded as honesty waned, insecurities became a way of living, jealously became a habit, being hurt started to feel natural, and running away from it all became our solution. Stop running! Face these issues, fix the problems, communicate, appreciate, forgive and LOVE the people in your life who deserve it.
  8. Making excuses rather than decisions. – Life is a continuous exercise in creative problem solving. A mistake doesn’t become a failure until you refuse to correct it. Thus, most long-term failures are the outcome of people who make excuses instead of decisions.
  9. Overlooking the positive points in your life. – What you see often depends entirely on what you’re looking for. Do your best and surrender the rest. When you stay stuck in regret of the life you think you should have had, you end up missing the beauty of what you do have. You will have a hard time ever being happy if you aren’t thankful for the good things in your life right now.
  10. Not appreciating the present moment. – We do not remember days, we remember moments. Too often we try to accomplish something big without realizing that the greatest part of life is made up of the little things. Live authentically and cherish each precious moment of your journey. Because when you finally arrive at your desired destination, I guarantee you, another journey will begin. (Marc & Angel Chernoff)

Here’s To Your Success,

Until next time!

Prosperously yours,

 Jerry

P.S. Remember The Buck $tarts Here


Jerry Scicchitano
Jerry Scicchitano is known for turning ideas into action. His concept paper, “The Entrepreneurial Mall,” was presented at the 20th Annual Entrepreneurship Education Forum, sponsored by the Kauffman Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership. Jerry is the author of Part Time Income Enterprise (Morgan James Publishing), and founding sponsor of the M.H.S Entrepreneur and Inventors Club. Jerry also sits on the board for two non-profits: The Every Child Deserves a Chance Foundation and Jesus – The Divine Mercy Foundation.

How often do you try to do more than one thing at a time? When you do too many things at once, it’s impossible to be present-moment oriented. You not only lose out on much of the enjoyment of what you are doing, but you also become less focused and effective.

Do you try to do more than one thing at once? Below are some examples of multitasking are any of these statements true for you?

  • I try to get my coffee brewing while I’m in the shower
  • I get a head start by making calls on my cell while driving to work
  • I usually drink my first cup of coffee while getting dressed in the morning
  • I read the paper while waiting at a stop light
  • I put on my makeup while driving to work
  • I listen to music or talk radio while working at my desk
  • While I’m at home the TV is always on-no matter what I’m doing
  • I talk to friends on the phone while doing household chores
  • While exercising I like to watch TV or listen to music
  • I always have my cell phone with me even during a movie date
  • It is hard to get any work done I am always getting phone calls
  • While watching TV at night, I pay my bills, knit, or do crossword puzzles
  • Before going to sleep, I read watch the news, or listen to the radio at the same time
  1.  If 5 or less of these apply to you you’re about average. And you may be losing out on the enjoyment of what you are doing.
  2.  If 5-8 of the statements apply to you you’re probably less focused and less effective than you could be.

-What are a few things you could do to enhance your concentration?

-What are some things that might help you to be more present in what       you’re doing?

-Do you find that as you concentrate on just one thing, you enjoy it more? Why?

3.  If 9 or more statements apply to you you’re are not a present-moment oriented person.

-You might try blocking out periods of time when you commit to doing only one thing at a time. Ask yourself if you find yourself becoming more absorbed and interested in your activity when you are less distracted?

– Do you find that you get things done more quickly and efficiently when you only do one thing at a time?

For most of us it will not be easy to slow down and do one thing at a time. But with a little effort you will start to become more productive and start to really enjoy what you are doing.

Here’s To Your $uccess,

Until next time!

Prosperously yours,

Jerry

P.S. Remember The Buck $tarts Here


Jerry Scicchitano
Jerry Scicchitano is known for turning ideas into action. His concept paper, “The Entrepreneurial Mall,” was presented at the 20th Annual Entrepreneurship Education Forum, sponsored by the Kauffman Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership. Jerry is the author of Part Time Income Enterprise (Morgan James Publishing), and founding sponsor of the M.H.S Entrepreneur and Inventors Club. Jerry also sits on the board for two non-profits: The Every Child Deserves a Chance Foundation and Jesus – The Divine Mercy Foundation.

When I first started telling people that I was starting a part-time business, the reactions I received were less than positive. Many friends and family members didn’t understand why I wasn’t content with the six-figure job I had at a Fortune500 company. And many of the full-time entrepreneurs I met actually snubbed me. I was told that since I was only doing it on the side, I couldn’t really call myself an entrepreneur. So like many employedpreneurs (employed entrepreneurs), I only told business friends and clients about my day job when I was asked directly or if it was going to impact a project. It wasn’t until 2011 that I fully came out of the cubicle and started talking boldly about launching my business on the side while working full-time at my day job.

With the recent government shutdown, I’ve started thinking about how smart it is to have a part-time business, or at least a skill you can use to make money on the side. Three people in my family have been impacted by the shutdown, including my husband who consciously chose a government job because of the predictable stability and security of being a federal employee. A lesson learned by the nearly 500,000 employees impacted by the 2013 shutdown and many others that have sown their talents and years in corporate America is that there are no guarantees.

My experience in the world of work, in both profit and not-for-profit organizations, has taught me that there is no such thing as stability and security when someone else controls your paycheck. Changes in management and employee turnover were common. Annual raises or even cost-of-living adjustments were never guaranteed, even for those with performances that exceeded expectations. Even if you weren’t laid off, organizational reorganizations could force you into a role that you were ill suited for.

We’ve come to expect and even accept swings and shifts in the corporate world, but now waves of instability and insecurity are sweeping through jobs in the public sector. Since 1998, close to 700,000 public jobs have been lost, including the jobs of approximately 300,000 teachers. Chances are the numbers of public sector jobs lost will continue in a downward trend. And even though private sector employment is slowly increasing, the earning potential is no longer the same. Bottom line: solely relying on one or even multiple employers can be risky — just as risky as starting a part-time business.

It’s a smart idea for enterprising professionals to take matters (and their financial well being) into their own hands by starting a part-time business, especially factoring how technology supports virtual work across global markets. Here are six reasons why:

  1. You can choose to do something you love. Not only are there books, coaches, and websites devoted to turning your passion into a profitable business, there are countless success stories. Examples that come to mind are Shark Tank success stories like I Want to Draw a Cat for You and The Painted Pretzel or Etsy top sellers like ZenThreads.
  2. You can put your skills, experience, and education to use. Do you belong to that growing number of people who spent close to six-figures on an education you hardly use in your day job? Taking on consulting projects on the side can give you a chance to stay engaged with your intended field and keep your practical experience current.
  3. Side businesses are scalable and can be location independent. Since you are the master of the business plan for your part-time business, you can take on as many or as few clients as you need. Unless you are providing a physical service like landscaping, you can work on projects and meet with clients from anywhere. Should you experience a lay-off or government shut down in the future, having the ability to take on a few more client projects to replace lost wages can be a huge weight off your shoulders.
  4. There’s a growing community of freelancers and independent contractors. Recent numbers show that there are roughly 17 million self-employed professionals in the U.S. This community includes those who work in highly creative and knowledge-based fields like consulting and sales, as well as more manual fields like construction. Virtual communities and resources for this group like the Freelancers Union are making this work and life style more appealing and accessible.
  5. There’s a good chance it can help you “keep” your job. A study by Intuit in 2010 predicted that by 2020, 40 percent of the working population would be contingent or independent workers. Your current employer may not be able or willing to keep you as a full-time employee, but they may be able to hire you as a contractor or for temporary projects.
  6. Your part-time business may have the potential to become a full-time million-dollar business. After being snubbed by a few full-time entrepreneurs who didn’t take people with businesses on the side seriously, I started doing some research. I found several examples of people that had successfully started their businesses while working a day job. I even found examples of six and seven-figure success stories including, Daymond John of FUBU, Mary Ellen Sheets of Two Men and a Truck, and Sarah Blakely, founder of Spanx — the world’s youngest self-made female billionaire.

Even if you aren’t looking to completely ditch your day job, start thinking about a set of skills you can use to earn additional income. If you have the least bit of entrepreneurial spirit and are willing to find the right problem to solve with your talents and experience, starting a business on the side just makes sense. While you can’t control legislative decisions or the labor market, you can take control of your earning potential by starting a part-time business.         By Tai Goodwin

Here’s To Your Success,

Until next time!

Prosperously yours,

Jerry

P.S. Remember The Buck $tarts Here


Jerry Scicchitano
Jerry Scicchitano is known for turning ideas into action. His concept paper, “The Entrepreneurial Mall,” was presented at the 20th Annual Entrepreneurship Education Forum, sponsored by the Kauffman Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership. Jerry is the author of Part Time Income Enterprise (Morgan James Publishing), and founding sponsor of the M.H.S Entrepreneur and Inventors Club. Jerry also sits on the board for two non-profits: The Every Child Deserves a Chance Foundation and Jesus – The Divine Mercy Foundation.